The Kiffness on his Covid-19 version of Toto’s Africa: ‘I kind of knew it would go viral’

The Kiffness strikes again! 

If there’s anyone who’s mastered the art of infotainment on the digital space, its record producer David Scott, also known as The Kiffness, whose Facebook video urging his followers to stay at home during this coronavirus pandemic came right on time to people’s social media feeds.

When David isn’t producing music or performing at events, he’s entertaining his nearly 50 000 followers who stay glued to his timeline for a good chuckle.

Most recently, his content has unintentionally centered around the coronavirus, with one video seeming to get more attention than the others.

“I received quite a few suggestions just on my Instagram stories,” The Kiffness tells YOU.

“I put up one of those question boxes, people sent their suggestions and I saw ‘Toto’. I [decided I] could do Toto’s Africa but it’s gonna be hard not to butcher it – it’s a masterpiece.

“Like the vocals, the harmonies, and everything – it’s just so well-done, so I decided, I’m up for the challenge and I exceeded my own expectations.”

He says although he may not consider himself a vocalist, he had a gut feeling that it would get a good dedication video after he spent 10 hours on the project.

“I kind of knew it would go viral. I normally get a sense – before I put these videos out – whether something is gonna do well or not but it’s just a gut feeling. If I can surprise myself when I make something and I’m excited to put it out, it’s normally a good sign and I definitely got that with this . . . I wasn’t expecting that kind of support.

“I even found myself just watching it as a spectator a few hours after making it and it was just entertaining to watch. So I think the combination of it just sounding good, looking good and having a good message – those three things together are just the key ingredients for a powerful viral video,” he said.

As an artist whose main stream of income requires a great gathering, David says he’s thrilled he went viral.

But the message in the video shouldn’t be overlooked as he too is exercising caution.

“All my gigs have been cancelled but I think I’m in a far better position than many musicians and businesses, I don’t have massive overheads.

“I’ve luckily got a bit of a rainy-day account, so things could be worse. I’m just trying to take whatever precautions possible and obviously just stay at home, trying to practise what I preach.

“I wanted the message to just get out there. I think it’s important that people stay home and I think music is possibly the best way to get that message across,” David says.

Speaking about the financial difficulties entertainers could face due to the coronavirus outbreak, he says he’s been working on sharing information so artists know how to claim royalties lest they suffer from having no income for as long as people are practising social distancing.

“I think a lot of musicians live hand to mouth and now that they don't have gigs it can be such a stressful time, so I’ve also been trying to educate people on how they can get royalties if your music has been active on radio and put as much information out there.”

David says he feels the pressure now more than ever to create an even better video than the last one and might take some time off watching Netflix while social distancing with his wife.

“I don’t know how I’m gonna top this Toto Africa video, to be honest, I’m almost scared to try something else,” he says.

“My brother calls it the creative hangover – when you’ve spent so much time on something that you’re proud of you almost have to chill out a little bit after making it, so I might just take three days and just do nothing and just watch Netflix before I can be inspired again. Inspiration comes at the weirdest times.”